Discovery Sport Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
All,

Had the DS out for some light off-roading around Lake Arrowhead CA area last weekend. Conditions were mixed, some sand, some water some mud. Disco and tires did well for the most part. I used the mud/ruts program or sand program for most terrain. Also I found using sport mode with paddle shift was very helpful. Hill descent kicked on in a few cases and a really cool digital inclinometer showed up on the digital dash.

Following are some pictures. I also posted some video on youtube. Link below.

On my first attempt at the larger uphill climb you can see the front right spin in air which tells me it wasn't transferring torque to the tires with traction. I know we don't have locking differentials but with the program engaged I would have thought I still would have been able to climb it in that circumstance.

By the way, my buddies Armada (on 20in street tires) was not able to make it up either the smaller or the larger incline.

Does anyone have detailed info on the AWD system? Who is the supplier? (Is it Haldex?) How does it work exactly?
You should save sand mode for beach driving. It allows the wheels to spin a lot more.
On that attempted climb, if you were in mud & ruts, you just needed to keep the throttle on for another half second and it would have braked that spinning wheel. It feels a clumsy method if you’ve had diff lockers before but you get used to how it works, and it’s what LR teaches you for when you have diagonally opposite wheels in the air.

My setup is just like yours, **** thing goes everywhere it can physically clear no troubles!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
What kind of roof rack is in your picture. I would love to buy a roof rack but want one similar to yours.

All, I just put a set of 255/65/R17 on our 2017 DS. Working with the installer (Discount Tire) the max recommended outer diameter they could guarantee no rubbing was 30.12in. I don't know if this is recommended by Discount or by LR. I had in mind going with the 245/70R17 which give 30.5in outer diameter. I chose the Falkens instead of the BFGs because of the cost (50USD a corner + full size spare) and I read that the K02s are noisier than the Falkens.

By the way, my list of size calculations and available tires is below as is a picture of the installed tires.

I have not experienced any rubbing or contact in the last two weeks I've had them. The have a bit more road noise and a slight decrease in economy.

Keeping in mind you can probably get away with the 30.5in out diameter without a lift or spacers but you'll also decrease the usable travel and space in the wheel well for chains. (Though I'm not sure where you're going where you would need AT tires + chains.)
@Rob Bell to answer your question 17 or 18 there are a lot of good reasons to go with the smaller rim diameter to increase the amount of sidewall especially in situations where you might air down the tires, such as on sand. Larger sidewalls also give greater protection against pinching on hard obstacles. I live in SoCal so sand and rocks were my main concern.

With regards to width you actually gain more contact patch in a air down tire with greater diameter than by going a few cm wider. A wider tire also increases rolling resistance and will decrease economy all other things being equal. However, there is also the look, if you like that. IMO I like the tall narrow cookie cutter look.

You would also have to factor in the expense of getting a 17in rim. I went with the new Boxer from Black Rhino. Personally I think it looks the business.

Next time I need tires I will likely get a 2in lift and put taller tires on. Will you please let me know if you have any questions?

Best,
PH
You can discretely wire a +40” light bar on the front runner rack using the windscreen gutter, no drilling required. Works great for night driving in the bush ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I haven’t seen any technical information, but I got told the basics on the course they give you when you buy the car. I don’t think they would share their specs in any detail anyway. I did find this document:

https://www.landrover.co.uk/explore...nology/technology-guide-terrain-response.html

It covers the basic ethos but to be honest you can feel what’s going on in the 3 modes that I have, plus if you look at the 4x4i screen it will tell you what the centre diff is doing.

My unofficial summary would be:

Sand - high power (lower gearing higher revving), fast throttle, TC dialled back to 20%, centre diff locked. The cross axle slip allows you to maintain momentum even if the car is drifting (I turn of DSC too, but they aren’t allowed) which prevents you from sinking in.

M&R - high torque, slow throttle response, delayed TC (this spin before TC brakes the wheel is to clear mud from your tread and to dig in a little to find a firmer base - opposite to beach driving), this mode feels clumsy at first but when you get used to it you learn to hold your throttle position and allow the wheel to spin then brake and drive the wheel with traction.

G/G/S - ignore gravel (unless you’ve gravelled your driveway with ball bearings) especially if you have AT tyres, this is for slow progress on very low traction surfaces like snow or a wet grassy field. High gearing, low torque, slow throttle, fast TC.

I could be slightly off with this summary so apply your own logic but it largely reflects how you would tackle things in normal 4WD. I know what you mean about needing to understand how it works in order to apply it correctly. Try tackling the same feature in the different modes a few times.

For the kind of stuff you were driving in those videos I would use M&R or probably general driving mode as it wasn’t actually that slippery. For firm/shallow sand I would also just use general. For rocky terrain where you may **** a wheel or 2, I would use M&R or general depending on how uneven the surface is.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bluebowtie67

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Glad I ran across this thread. Looks like we may turn our 2015 DS into a little overlander. We have an 03 Discovery 2 HSE7 but I don’t feel it’s reliable enough to kit out and risk it, so it will go into grocery getter/soccer mom duty and the DS might make more sense to kit out for some light to moderate over landing. I’m leaning towards 275/45r20 with the 30mm Eibach lift springs...if they still make them? I haven’t checked in a few years. Anyone have the lift springs on their DS?

edit quick search found that the Eibach springs are still available..
The lift kit works great off road and when the car is loaded up. When mine was done there was bit more noise from them in tight manoeuvres and stopping/starting but that has subsequently quietened down. Also, the place I got them done broke my brake pad wear sensors. The main downsides are that the car sits higher in the travel so when running light you may feel it top out more often. The handling is still good but you'll definitely feel the less refined ride on the road as i guess it can't be quite as supple with less negative travel available. Off road the lift puts you nicely in the range of other 4WD's which is a huge benefit in rutted areas so you clear instead of scraping or dragging. If you're overlanding I'm guessing the car will be loaded up so it's probably a wise investment as you lose a lot of clearance well before GVM on stock springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
They'll be fine. I have 30" diameter tyres on mine and they are great. Others have fitted even larger. I would recommend the 255/50R20's (if they exist in the Wildpeaks) as the extra width will protect your rims a little better - otherwise go with your plan as it's probably the best you can do on 20" rims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I think the DS AWD system is really sensitive to circumference differences. I personally wouldn't do it. I'd carry a spare on the roof rack or get one of these bad boys and chuck a full spare on there:
Rigd Ultraswing
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top